Stanley

Stumpy the Orca!










This blog is to inform people about Orca and other cetaceans, from individual stories to laws, as i learn i hope you all will learn with me.

I am an animator not a scientist and this blog is run by someone with anti captivity beliefs but i do tend to keep my posts neutral and informative.

stumpytheorcaadmin / posted on 19 April 2014

it confuses me when people flip pictures of Keiko

his freckles are on the wrong siiiiide it looks wieeerd


TAGS: draftdrabble queuestumpy

stumpytheorcaadmin / posted on 18 April 2014 Continued History of Captive Narwhalsfirst postNarwhals were first considered for captivity by the Vancouver aquarium because of the captive success of their closely related cousins- Beluga’s. So in August 1968 the aquarium send out workers to study and scout the feasibility of the project. Milne Inlet was selected as a possible capture site and an agreement was  made to engage the assistance of Eskimos. 
Dead Narwhals that where killed by the native hunters were examined so that properly proportioned slings could be made.  The first narwhal to be captured was a 5 m Narwhal with a 2 m tusk. It was captured in a net. It weighed an estimated 1 800 kg and was released because it was too large for the transporting gear.
The second narwhal to be captured was not captured by the capture team but by Eskimos - the capture team were called by the RCMP, two members of the capture team flew to Grise Fjord to secure the 3 m male Narwhal with a 15 cm tusk and bring it back to Vancouver
Three days later, the party captured two adult females and two nursing calves in nets extending 100 m out from the shore. These nets were 10 m deep and the meshes were 45 cm stretched. Another calf was captured with a head net while being chased in a motor boat. These Narwhals were moved 32 km in inflatable rubber boats to the airstrip and then, with great difficulty, were loaded into a Bristol freighter aircraft and flown to Vancouver. All six whales died of pneumonia, the calves whithin days of arrival the females 10 weeks- 2 months after and the last, the firstly captured male (Keeluluga) survived four months in captivity. Factors contributing to the death of the Narwhals were:
The hardship of capture
The 35 hours out of water during transportation, 
The relatively warm sea water in the Aquarium (12.8°C compared with 4.4° in the Arctic). 
Source:CAPTURING NARWHALS FOR THE VANCOUVER PUBLIC AQUARIUM, 1970 [By M. A. Newman, Director, Vancouver Public Aquarium, Vancouver.](I cannot link as i had to download the paper through my university)

Continued History of Captive Narwhals
first post

Narwhals were first considered for captivity by the Vancouver aquarium because of the captive success of their closely related cousins- Beluga’s. So in August 1968 the aquarium send out workers to study and scout the feasibility of the project. Milne Inlet was selected as a possible capture site and an agreement was  made to engage the assistance of Eskimos. 

Dead Narwhals that where killed by the native hunters were examined so that properly proportioned slings could be made.  

The first narwhal to be captured was a 5 m Narwhal with a 2 m tusk. It was captured in a net. It weighed an estimated 1 800 kg and was released because it was too large for the transporting gear.

The second narwhal to be captured was not captured by the capture team but by Eskimos - the capture team were called by the RCMP, two members of the capture team flew to Grise Fjord to secure the 3 m male Narwhal with a 15 cm tusk and bring it back to Vancouver

Three days later, the party captured two adult females and two nursing calves in nets extending 100 m out from the shore. These nets were 10 m deep and the meshes were 45 cm stretched. Another calf was captured with a head net while being chased in a motor boat.

These Narwhals were moved 32 km in inflatable rubber boats to the airstrip and then, with great difficulty, were loaded into a Bristol freighter aircraft and flown to Vancouver. All six whales died of pneumonia, the calves whithin days of arrival the females 10 weeks- 2 months after and the last, the firstly captured male (Keeluluga) survived four months in captivity.

Factors contributing to the death of the Narwhals were:

  • The hardship of capture
  • The 35 hours out of water during transportation, 
  • The relatively warm sea water in the Aquarium (12.8°C compared with 4.4° in the Arctic). 


Source:
CAPTURING NARWHALS FOR THE VANCOUVER PUBLIC AQUARIUM, 1970 [By M. A. Newman, Director, Vancouver Public Aquarium, Vancouver.]
(I cannot link as i had to download the paper through my university)


TAGS: might actually get in trouble for that... oops? queuestumpy narwhals narwhal whale captivity vancouver aquaruim vancouveraquaruim

/ posted on 18 April 2014

Anonymous asked

The last one on the left looks nice

stumpytheorcaadmin replied

Thank you nonnie! :3


a-rusty-trekkie via a-rusty-trekkie / posted on 18 April 2014

a-rusty-trekkie:

I can’t pick what type of clouds 

;_;

anyone spare a sec to smack me around the head and tell me which one works? 


TAGS: please i'm so tired of clouds

stumpytheorcaadmin / posted on 18 April 2014

My queue seems to be doing well… mostly so far its been stuff that’s been hiding in my drafts for yonks because i’ve either been too scared to post them or still researching stuff.

still rather proud of the narwhal history one took me ages to find a photo 


TAGS: not part of the queue recovering a little yaay hi!

stumpytheorcaadmin via stumpytheorca / posted on 18 April 2014

stumpytheorca:

Penn Cove Capture - 8th August 1970 (3:27-5:54)
(Warning- contains footage some may find disturbing- 2:45 onward)

Seven Orca were taken into captivity from this capture, Six Males and one Female, four died and the remaining sixty nine escaped.

The names of these captured orca are:
Chappy, Jumbo, Clovis, Winston, Ramu 4, Lil Nooka and Lolita 

Chappy and Jumbo were sold to Kamogawa Sea World - Chappy Died in April 1974  Jumbo in July 1974

Clovis was sold to 
Marineland Antibes in France- He died in 1973.

Winston (Ramu 3) was sold to Windsor Safari Park - UK he was sold back to Seaworld San Diego in 1976 however before he died in 1986. 

Ramu 4 was sold to Marineland Australia - he died in 1971 only surviving a year.

Lil Nooka was sent to Sea-Arama Marine World in Texas. He survived 7 months in captivity before his death in March 1971.

Lolita is still alive after being sold to Miami Seaquaruim as a mate for Hugo. She is still there after 43 years in captivity.


TAGS: penncove queuestumpy

stumpytheorcaadmin / posted on 18 April 2014

All you cetacean blogs:

freedomforwhales:

Reblog this with your name on the end!

I think we should all do another “voice recording” thing and see if We can pronounce each other’s names right :)

Stevie


TAGS: its steve with an extra eeee sound really so not so hard :3 hi!

stumpytheorcaadmin / posted on 18 April 2014

I just worry that Seaworld is more interested in money than lives. Which is what they come off to me at the moment I realised they were fighting a company who controls health and safety … and for what?

Water work for the case of shows does just seem like a money maker to me rather than a benefit to the animals. (I’m not denying water work has it uses for if a trainer falls into the water but there is other ways that can be done than standing on a whales rostrum on a perimeter ride) When I see people comparing it to a the police/armed forces though i do feel rather ill. 

The armed forces and police force are provided with the latest equipment and technology to keep them alive, and they know what they are in for. Every incident for them is evaluated and decided how to improve survival for the next possible incident. Bullet proof vests are a good example for this. Regardless of this also- they are in their job to protect other peoples lives, not swim with a whale for a show.

Which is what essentially happened here OSHA aren’t out to ruin shamu shows- they are out to make sure the health and safety of the trainers are protected while they are employed at seaworld and they are not put at risk for harm or even death as that is not a part of there job description. 

Why are seaworld fighting them? the sake of their orcas or their pockets?


TAGS: waterworksdraftihavebeenworkingon queuestumpy orca waterwork orcas whales killer whales seaworld

lep.co.uk / posted on 18 April 2014

Preston’s free book shop set to expand

I am so pleased about this, only managed to make it recently myself and I cannot stress the importance of this place so I really hope expansion happens.

I struggle to return library books on time due to my disabilities - I can’t afford to buy the books and I want to learn new things… But I can go here, 3 free books a visit and I don’t have to worry about my bank balance or overdue fees. 

(So far I have gained a marine mammals guide, a marine ecology book and a documentary video about orcas)

I’ve donated a few books back and i can’t wait for my next visit when I hope I can get more education books!


TAGS: stumpypersonal cetaceanrelated books Freebooks free queuestumpy